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  • #12037
    @emmaconnor

    Is there any difference and/or does it matter?

    #12105
    @buschfunk

    I think there is a difference and, yes, it matters. Please note that the following statements derive from the Rapid Software Testing class I attended with James Bach and Michael Bolton. I don’t want to quote but I support their ideas so that’s why I will post here 🙂

    QA in its “common meaning” is Quality Assurance. That’s a term testers should get away from. No tester can assure the quality of the product under test. As far as I can see there are two roles which can assure quality: a developer by writing code and a project manager by e.g. increasing resources, etc.

    What a tester can do through testing is providing information which may affect quality decisions. Please see this post:

    Testers: Get Out of the Quality Assurance Business

    #12380
    @aleksandra-kornecka

    In a huge shortcut I’d say that: the Quality Assurance includes the testing in its scope – either in scope of one person’s work, or in the scope of two persons from QA team (e.g.Test Manager takes care of all processes within the quality assurance and the tester builds test plans, proejct and perform test cases etc.).

    #12453
    @christina

    My interpretation is that Quality Assurance covers the processes/procedures put in place to ensure that the quality of the product is as good as it can be. This covers review meetings at every point from scoping to sign-off and should involve all members of the production team (product owners, analysts, devs, testers etc). Testing is just one aspect of Quality Assurance. At each step of the development life-cycle there should be sufficient checks in place to minimise the risk of a problem occurring. If QA is introduced right at the start of the project (ensuring the initial requirement and scoping is clear) then there is less chance of a problem occurring down the line. I’ve worked on projects in the past that have cut corners early on and the poor dev who’s new to the area of software (or even the entire product) has to interpret some very brief notes made quite some time ago; a recipe for disaster especially if the tester isn’t sufficiently familiar with the product to spot gaps in impact analysis.

    #12511
    @emmaconnor

    Thanks for your responses @buschfunk @aleksandra-kornecka and @christina – all really great points! It sounds like testing is definitely part of the QA process and there is a lot more people involved rather than just testers.

    @michaelabolton ‘s blog that you shared @buschfunk highlights some great points – have any of you encountered these challenges of trying to influence programmers / managers? And if yes, what have you learned or what steps do you take now to help?
    Or do your teams have any particular steps/strategies in the QA process that you find work well for helping you as a tester involved in the QA process?

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