Test strategy on free software

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  • #11708
    Paul French
    Participant
    @paul-french

    All,

    Has anyone worked on any “free” software – for example, marketing apps, or other free software.

    How has the fact that it’s free (on a mass market) changed your test strategy, if at all?

    Was there more emphasis on getting as much testing out for as little cost, or was there a smaller amount of testing? Did you have a higher tolerance for open defects etc.

    #11787
    Jesper
    Participant
    @jesper-lindholt-ottosen

    Interesting.

    I have used and configured Podio for NGOs but have not profesionally tested any

    #11826
    Anurag khode
    Participant
    @anurag-khode

    I tested many free apps like Twitter, FB Widgets, Tvider, Redbox and all these company though offering free products were one of the most competitive companies in the market and were serious about their product. App, software can be fee but monetisation method may be different. It also depends on which company is offering this free products or software. I had chance to work with Verizon for one of their free app and they were one of the most technical team I ever came across and they were very serious about the Quality of the apps.

    #11891
    Paul French
    Participant
    @paul-french

    Hi Anurag – Agree. We can’t pre-judge the “free” app as there’s free apps who’s goal is to create monetising opportunity and others which perhaps have different goals. The determination of the testing requirements and quality etc are all determined on the purpose of the app rather than how much it is selling for as such. I can certainly understand how apps like FB, Twitter etc absolutely need to be technically sound as this is largely a principle platform for them to operate through.

    #16457
    Archana
    Participant
    @archana

    I had tested the Google Music App some time back (part of crowdsource testing). Though it was a Google product, most of the defects raised by all the testers were rejected as won’t fix and they were not fixed at all. This was a bit unexpected.

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