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karen

  • Hello Anne

    I read your comment about not wanting to question 29119 in this forum, ok. But I do want to ask (and I believe this is one point to the discussion), can you share:

    1. How does 29119 help you? I did not see or hear a direct correlation to 29119. Perhaps the correlation is implicit to you and that is understandable if you work with…[Read more]

  • Nithin Shenoy
    Q:@Neil One of the books that has helped me out in my career has been The Platinum Rule. There are so many different personality and communication styles. This book helps to understand some of the challenges of communicating with people that may have a style of communication that differs from your own, which can be a major source of…[Read more]

  • Alt
    Q: One aspect i didn’t notice you mention in this presentation. What about the question(s) not being answered? from my perspective there are several aspects:
    like the first would be – i did not formulate the question in the language and structure that is easier understandable to the person which got questioned,
    the person responded par…[Read more]

  • Neil
    Q:
    I liked your point about “senior architects” – I’ve known one or two of those in my previous employment, and I agree with the strategies that you raised. Self-deprecation always works well – “Can you show me what’s happening here, I think I’ve done something stupid…” and so forth. Still, it’s irritating that there can sometimes be key pill…[Read more]

  • Richard Forjoe
    Q; What techniques do you use to make sense of answers from questions?

    Karen
    A:
    I need alone time. I need time to process. And in the quiet, I review my notes. I experiment with software to learn from what I’ve heard to see what I can see on my own. I find out what I still don’t know and then I go back for me. I expect my lea…[Read more]

  • Richard Forjoe
    Q: What do you do if you feel you have too many questions for someone? Do you have any suggestions on how to identify important questions from not so important ones?
    Great presentation again. Thank you

    Karen
    A: Thanks.

    Bundling questions in a “nest” of questions and telling the person, I have a bundle of questions on this top…[Read more]

  • Melissa Bingham
    Q: great presentation. Reminds me why i like testing, the whole investigation part is what draws me to testing field.
    i feel like i also learned a lot about answering questions as well 🙂

    I find it challenging to determine what type of questions to ask at what part of the SDLC(before development, during development..etc). Any…[Read more]

  • Alt
    Q: Question: your take in cases when the deadline is closer and instead of timing the content and straight to the point are more welcomed?

    A: When deadlines are close, stress and tension increase and everyone handles that tension differently. Some people when approached with questions – or for that matter anything that will take time away…[Read more]

  • Alt
    Q: Question – how often you get asked the right question in the right time?

    A: I’m not sure what you mean by this question. Can you clarify?

  • Alt
    Q: Some really great tester add examples were given. You must have seen also not so great and interesting ones. Care to mention them as well? 🙂 – See more at: https://huddle.eurostarsoftwaretesting.com/members/alt_lv/#sthash.3rpvNcc5.dpuf

    A: Without getting into specific examples – I can generalize that I have seen on multiple occasions people (developers and…[Read more]

  • @dave-mitchell
    Q: Where does the line lie between being a “Question Killer” and having questions thrown at you in a way that you react badly to (contextually, such as your example of the “morning rush” girl)? Answering questions is as much of a minefield as asking them, and it can be tough to know when you’ve crossed the boundary between,…[Read more]

  • For me, I prefer not to be questioned when I’m just arriving – especially in the morning. However as a consultant, I’ve had to get over that frustration and roll with it more – especially if I’m not onsite everyday or on a short assignment/project. I suppose how you approach me (and what our background is already) influences the dialog as well.…[Read more]

  • karen posted a new activity comment 5 years, 1 month ago

    Thanks for your comments~

    I appreciate the example you’ve drawn as well as how you tackled the problem – great solutions. My first reaction reading your story was – 3rd party vendor probably felt territorial about the information because what they know/believed keeping information to themselves would give them an advantage and they are less…[Read more]

  • karen posted a new activity comment 5 years, 1 month ago

    All the references from today:

    The Five Whys

    Harvard Business Review, http://blogs.hbr.org/2010/04/the-five-whys-for-startups/

    Harvard Business Review, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JmrAkHafwHI

    The Phoenix Checklist

    Malbon, Ben. Blog: How the CIA define problems and plan solutions: The Phoenix Checklist…[Read more]

  • karen posted a new activity comment 5 years, 1 month ago

    I think reading this may be helpful: http://context-driven-testing.com/

    In the beginning focus on bigger (wider point of view) questions like:

    what is the purpose of this product?
    what is this feature supposed to do?
    when would a user need this function?
    how we will know we built the right product?
    how will we know we built the product…[Read more]

  • karen posted a new activity comment 5 years, 1 month ago

    Bundling questions in a “nest” of questions and telling the person, I have a bundle of questions on this topic is one way to diminish the number of questions you have. You may have one bundle but 10 questions in that bundle.

    tips:

    Ask the most leading, open-ended questions you can.

    Tell the other person what you want to learn and put that out…[Read more]

  • karen posted a new activity comment 5 years, 1 month ago

    I need alone time. I need time to process. And in the quiet, I review my notes. I experiment with software to learn from what I’ve heard to see what I can see on my own. I find out what I still don’t know and then I go back for me. I expect my learning to be iterative and I’ve stopped beating myself up for that being the case.

  • karen posted a new activity comment 5 years, 1 month ago

    It is irritating to always have to be the self-deprecating person – I agree. Still I suppose what matters more to me is gaining the information I need. And sometimes with truly obnoxious people – they believe they take the lead even when I’m not being self-deprecating (because no one is as smart as them). In those cases, be grateful you’re working…[Read more]

  • karen posted a new activity comment 5 years, 1 month ago

    Well there are a couple of ways to prevent being a “question killer”
    a) get back to the person at another time
    b) reply with patience when you do get back to them – don’t rush them – show them that it was a case of bad timing
    c) do more than answer their questions – make sure they get what they need – ask questions back such as: did that help?…[Read more]

  • karen posted a new activity comment 5 years, 1 month ago

    When time is limited and I have questions I need resolved, I would slip in one or two questions at a time.

    Or ask the other person which is better for you: a) a question here and there or b) time scheduled and I can bring you several questions at once.

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